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Day 3: A reusable depilation kit

 
Picture of Clara del Rey
Day 3: A reusable depilation kit
by Clara del Rey - 17 June 2015
 
Clara del Rey // 17 June 2015 // #GoingGreen #WasteNot

Reusable depilation kit | © Clara del Rey

Reusable depilation kit | © Clara del Rey

If you try to keep a sustainable lifestyle, sooner or later you will come across the eternal question: What do I do about my facial and body hair? The easiest solution is to stop removing it once for all, but that is just a personal choice and let’s face it, not for every taste.

Because I do care about waste but at the same time, I want to remove my body hair, I came up with the idea for this reusable depilation kit. The electric epilator (2004) was a present from my mum when I moved to Madrid for my studies, and still looks and works like new. The grandpa-style stainless steel razor (2011) cost £5 and has been with me ever since. The fact that industries have hidden steel razors from our markets, substituting them with disposable ones made from plastic, is one way economic interests for profit clash with the actual needs of nature and the environment. Because these products just endure, and you don't need to buy more than two or three in your life, it is safe to say that they are quite uninteresting to money makers. Here's an interesting post by Lauren Stinger of Trash is for Tossers about her approach to zero waste shaving.


Clara del Rey, the winner of the travel well MAGAZINE's #WasteNot 30-day challenge , was invited to share her favorite ideas on reducing trash. Clara, a Spanish native, taught in St. Joseph, Missouri (USA), and is now living in Edinburgh, Scotland. Not only does she know both the U.S. and the European perspective on sustainability, but her ideas are creative, unconventional, and yet easy to follow.She is conviced: "I truly think being environmentally conscious starts with reducing your consumption of resources and products. Sometimes I stop, reflect upon people's frantic consumption habits and just think to myself: we are all addicts, in a way, having to buy compulsively insane amounts of disposable, poor quality 'goods'. It makes me wonder how we are losing the ability to create things with our hands or imagination—simple things such as cooking, growing greens and vegetables, or sewing a button. I refuse to represent this mindset."