Blog

Day 2: An eco-friendly alternative to your regular deodorant

 
Picture of Clara del Rey
Day 2: An eco-friendly alternative to your regular deodorant
by Clara del Rey - 16 June 2015
 
Clara del Rey // 16 June 2015 // #GoingGreen #WasteNot

Crystal rock deodorant, bought in Kansas City, April 2014 | © Clara del Rey

Crystal rock deodorant, bought in Kansas City, April 2014 | © Clara del Rey


Once I had completely freed the showering process from waste, my second resolution for a sustainable bathroom was to swap classic deodorants (aerosol or roll-on) for a deodorant crystal rock. It has been more than a year now since I bought this one in Kansas City (April 2014), and it still goes on and on, potentially lasting for several more months. It came packed in a cardboard box, but even if you only find it in a plastic container, the fact that it lasts for so long makes buying it absolutely worthy.

Unlike the usual deodorants, crystal type deodorant isn’t fragranced, and for that reason it can take you a while to get used to it. And yes, this type of deodorant won’t always keep you from sweating (it is not an anti-perspirant), but it inhibits bacteria and so prevents body odor from occurring. They are typically made from minerals and salts that occur in nature. Furthermore, it doesn’t block your pores and it seems to be free of chemicals that are assumed to be related to different kinds of health risks, for example breast cancer—so tons of good reasons to give it a try. Want to learn more about this eco-friendly alternative? Then check out this user review on mineral rock deodorants.

 


Clara del Rey, the winner of the travel well MAGAZINE's #WasteNot 30-day challenge , was invited to share her favorite ideas on reducing trash. Clara, a Spanish native, taught in St. Joseph, Missouri (USA), and is now living in Edinburgh, Scotland. Not only does she know both the U.S. and the European perspective on sustainability, but her ideas are creative, unconventional, and yet easy to follow.She is conviced: "I truly think being environmentally conscious starts with reducing your consumption of resources and products. Sometimes I stop, reflect upon people's frantic consumption habits and just think to myself: we are all addicts, in a way, having to buy compulsively insane amounts of disposable, poor quality 'goods'. It makes me wonder how we are losing the ability to create things with our hands or imagination—simple things such as cooking, growing greens and vegetables, or sewing a button. I refuse to represent this mindset."