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Day 1: Waste-free soap bars

 
Picture of Clara del Rey
Day 1: Waste-free soap bars
by Clara del Rey - 15 June 2015
 
Clara del Rey // 15 June 2015 //  #GoingGreen #WasteNot

When I decided to begin my journey toward a waste-free lifestyle, the first space I put my hands onto was our bathroom. Besides our kitchen, this is, the room where we store most products packaged in single-use, toxic and non-biodegradable materials (you’re guessing right, most of the time this is plastics). And it’s not even hard to realize this: Almost all products found in the bathroom, from cleaning supplies and detergents to body care products, everything appears to be packaged in plastic bottles that are designed to be used just once.

Waste-free soap bars | © Clara del Rey
Waste-free soap bars | © Clara del Rey


So let’s start with one easy step. It is actually very easy to substitute all your shampoos, conditioners, and shower gels with their fragranced, natural and wrap-free bar equivalents. I’m not even talking about the countless additives and chemicals that are commonly identified in many beauty and cleansing products. When it comes to packaging materials, doing the simple math of calculating the amount of plastic containers I’d be saving the environment by changing this simple habit truly encouraged me to become waste-free. These bars look great – and they clean my skin and hair so effectively that, for me, there is no way back! Now, for those of you who’d like to try out a few of these things in their bathrooms as well, check out these five simple tips toward going ‘zero waste’ in your bathroom. Also, if you got curious about these package-free soap bars, why not make your own from scratch? These recipes from the treehugger blog will surprise you and get you hooked on making your own soap, trust me.

 


Clara del Rey, the winner of the travel well MAGAZINE's #WasteNot 30-day challenge , was invited to share her favorite ideas on reducing trash. Clara, a Spanish native, taught in St. Joseph, Missouri (USA), and is now living in Edinburgh, Scotland. Not only does she know both the U.S. and the European perspective on sustainability, but her ideas are creative, unconventional, and yet easy to follow.She is conviced: "I truly think being environmentally conscious starts with reducing your consumption of resources and products. Sometimes I stop, reflect upon people's frantic consumption habits and just think to myself: we are all addicts, in a way, having to buy compulsively insane amounts of disposable, poor quality 'goods'. It makes me wonder how we are losing the ability to create things with our hands or imagination—simple things such as cooking, growing greens and vegetables, or sewing a button. I refuse to represent this mindset."